Knowledgebase

MOST POPULAR ARTICLES

Possible Reasons for E-1 (or Err1)

NOTE: E- 1 errors read as "Err1" on controls manufactured before 2006

Elements
  • If you see an E-1 or Err1, then for some reason the kiln could not generate enough heat to counter the heat loss. If one of the elements or one of the circuits in the control fails while the kiln is at a high enough temperature, then it will probably display an Err8 code (which means temperature is falling when it should be rising)
  • Err1 or Err8 can mean either you need new elements or a new component in one of the circuits. A Paper Test, an Ohms Test and a Voltage test can tell you which it is. 
  • Non-standard elements from an unauthorized supplier have too much resistance, or you did not hook them up properly (leaving the jumper wire out of a J230 section will double the resistance in that circuit and only one of the two elements will be used. Always use a ohms meter to check the element and circuit ohms.)

Press the Review button after the firing.

This only works on DynaTrols manufactured after 2006.

A customer asks: I would like to program my kiln to heat to Cone 6 then cool normally to 950°F and then hold for one hour at 950°F and then cool naturally.

You just need a four segment program in the Vary-Fire in the DynaTro.

  • First segment heats to around 250°F pretty slowly.
  • Next segment heats more quickly (400°F per hour) almost to cone 6
  • Next segment is slower over the last 100°F or so to cone 6
  • Last segment allows the kiln to cool naturally to 950°F, and then holds it there for an hour
  • Here is a sequence of keys to hit to enter this program into your DynaTrol:

    When it says IDLE, press the following:

  • ENTER PROG/ 1/ ENTER/ 4/ ENTER/
  • 150/ ENTER/ 250/ ENTER/ 0/ ENTER/
  • 400/ ENTER/ 2100/ ENTER/ 0/ ENTER/
  • 108/ ENTER/ OTHER/ 6/ ENTER/ 0/ ENTER/
  • 400/ ENTER/ 950/ ENTER/ 100/ ENTER/ ENTER.
  • Thats it... This program is called "USER 1". It will

    The DynaTrol control panel can be programmed to fire to up to 2400° F or 1315° C. No special programming is needed to fire to the DynaTrol's maximum temperature, though if Celsius is wished to be used instead of Fahrenheit the control must be set to fire that way.

    That is a difficult question to answer, as the longevity of a kiln is based much more on how it is being used and maintained, rather than how old it is. Answer these question for a better idea of the variables at hand and what to expect.

  • What cone(s) do you fire up to?
  • How many times a week do you fire?
  • How many shelves do you use in a typical firing?
  • Do you ever load ware past the edge of the shelf?
  • Do you use a downdraft venting system with the kiln?
  • How often is the kiln vacuumed out?
  • How often are the stainless steel case tighteners tightened on the kiln rings and lid?
  • Do you fire fast programs or slow programs?
  • Do you hold or soak the kiln at the highest temps?
  • What specifically is put in the kiln?
  • Do you add organics to the clay or kiln?
  • Do you use a lot of wax resist? Does it get hot in the kiln room ever?
  • If so how
  • The Vent-Sure downdraft kiln vent is pulling not only air but moisture and the products of hot moinsture and the chemicals that are present in the clay. Some of these prodcts are highly acidic (like sulfuric acid, hydrofluric acid and others). The exact amount and composition of the effluents of your kiln, and hence in the vent, will vary with how dry your work is and what is in the clay to begin with. The Vent life seems to be totally dependent on these conditions. The more moisture and acids created by the materials in the clay and water then the shorter the vent life. If you have good conditions the vent can last for many years - if not - then you will be repalcing various parts over the years.

    That said - L&L's experience has been very positive. We have sold thousends of Vent-Sures for over 15 years. We sell very few replacement motors and other parts. The most vulnerable part seems to be the thin aluminum flexible duct that goes from the kiln to the vent motor. This

    Question: I am about to run my first bisque firing in my new L&L kiln. I have coated the floor of the kiln for the test first fire along with the shelves that I put in for the firing. I coated them again for the bisque firing I will start today. I intend to do one more coat when I attempt my first glaze firing. My question is this. How many times do I coat the shelves? Is this something that is done whenever you do a glaze firing now that the original coats will be baked on? Or, is it sufficient to work with the 3 coats and just repair a spot if needed? The kiln is purely for hobby and don't anticipate a heavy firing schedule but I want to follow all the protocols and develop a good work/play ethic as I get things in order for my much anticipated retirement.

    Answer: The principle is really just making sure that dripping/ running glaze doesn't stick to the shelf. Three coatings is a rule of thumb but can certainly vary from person to person with the types of

    To Calculate Maximum Load Weight

    Calculate the area of your hearth plate. Example: In an e28T-3 there are two 25.5" diameter half hearth plates. The total area is Pie*Radius Squared. The radius is 25.5/2 = 12.75". 12.75 X 12.75 = 162.56. Multiply by 3.14. 162.56 X 3.14 = 510 square inches. Divide by 144 to get square feet. 510 / 144 = 3.54 square feet.

    For Easy-Fire, Easy-Fire XT, Jupiter, eQuad-Pro, JH Series, eFL Series, School-Master, Liberty-Belle, Fuego, Doll KIlns: Figure 100 pounds per square foot. In the example above then the maximum weight that can be put on the hearth (assuming even loading) is 100 X 3.54 = 354 pounds.

    For DaVinci Kilns: Figure 150 pounds per square foot.

    For Easy-Load Kilns: Figure 200 pounds per square foot.

    Even Loading

    The other factor is that the brick is mostly non-compressible as long as the load is spread out evenly. For heavy loads we recommend putting a hearth plate right on the bottom of the

    REGULAR KILN MAINTENANCE

    To keep your kiln in top operating condition, we recommend the following minimum housekeeping:

    KILN MAINTENANCE AFTER EACH FIRING
  • Turn off the kiln at the circuit breaker or fused disconnect switch.
  • Check element holders and walls for glaze, clay chips or anything that could melt at a high temperature.  If melted clay or glaze comes in contact with an element, a rapid failure could result.  The molten material traps the heat radiating from the element and subsequently raises the surface temperature of the wire.  The temperature will quickly pass the maximum recommended for the wire and burn it up.  To clean holders, a good shop vacuum will handle dust and loose crumbs.  A very gentle chisel or grinder may help with glaze contamination on element holders, but remember that the elements themselves are quite brittle when they are cool. Replace the contaminated holder if you can not clean it. Remove any glaze that has
  • Add Time to Hold Period

    Available only during a hold period. This option allows you to add time in 5 minute increments to a hold (soak) period. When in a hold period (during a hold or soak, the temperature in the kiln will be alternating in the display with the remaining hold time), press the UP key. When "SStP" is displayed press the UP key again and "tME"  will be displayed. Note that the "M" is displayed as two upside down "U"s. Press ENTER and 5 minutes will be added to the hold time. You may use this procedure as many times as necessary to get the hold time that you want.

    Add Temperature to Hold Period

    Available only during a hold period.  This option allows you to add temperature in 5 degree increments to a hold (soak) period. When in a hold period (during a hold or soak, the temperature in the kiln will be alternating in the display with the remaining hold time), press the UP key. When "SStP" is displayed press the UP key twice more and "tMP"

    Change of Program During Firing: When firing you can alter the program anytime. You must press START/STOP, then reprogram, then press “Start”. The Dynatrol will automatically take the current temperature into consideration and start back up at that point in the program. If you attempt to do this right at the end of a firing, the amount of time it takes to reprogram is not accounted for by the Dynatrol. If more than a few minutes go by, the temperature displayed may not accurately represent the amount of heat work taking place in the kiln. Another reason to fire with witness cones.

    Change of Program During Firing: When firing you can alter the program anytime. You must press START/STOP, then reprogram, then press “Start”. The Dynatrol will automatically take the current temperature into consideration and start back up at that point in the program. If you attempt to do this right at the end of a firing, the amount of time it takes to reprogram is not accounted for by the Dynatrol. If more than a few minutes go by, the temperature displayed may not accurately represent the amount of heat work taking place in the kiln. Another reason to fire with witness cones.

    To calculate how many CFM of air ventilation you need moving through a kiln room
  • Look up the amount of BTU/Hour that your kiln kill give off. See the BTU chart located on the General Dimension Drawing of the kiln model. You can download the General Dimension Drawing from the web page for that kiln model.
  • Use the BTU/Hour figure based on the maximum temperature you will be firing to. You can extrapolate these numbers. For instance you can pick a BTU/Hour number between the column for 2232°F and 2350°F for Cone 8 firing.
  • Assume the maximum temperature you want in the room is 120°F. This is below the safe limitation of the control and is probably as hot as you will want it to be in the room anyway.
  • Figure what your typical hottest day is. You may decide not to fire your kiln, for instance, when it is 105°F outside and that you will use something like 100°F as this design temperature.
  • This gives you a Delta T (temperature
  • The type of thermocouple on a DynaTrol (with the Blue face) can be either Type K or Type S.

  • You must have the appropriate thermocouples and lead wire to switch from one to the other; either Type K thermocouples and wire or Type S. See this link for more information.
  • In the Hidden Menu you must switch the software setting from “K-TH” to “S-TH”, or vise versa. Pressing any number key toggles you back and forth from K-TH to S-TH. See this link and follow the instructions for "TYPE".
  • For precaution, a small jumper must be moved on the circuit board when going from K to S. 
  • This jumper is located approximately in the center of the board under the marking “R97”. On the other side of (as shown in the photo) is the marking "Type S".
  • If the jumper is on only one of the prongs the control is set for Type K. If the jumper
  • The type of thermocouple on a Genesis can be either Type K or Type S.

  • You must have the appropriate thermocouples and lead wire to switch from one to the other; either Type K thermocouples and wire or Type S. See this link for more information.
  • To begin, you must access the "TC-Type" menu to choose the appropriate thermocouple type.  
  • Select the "Menu" button
  • Next, select the "6-Factory Config." button
  • Enter "443" and then select the "Save" button
  • Then, select the "1-TC-Type" button
  • Finally, choose the type of thermocouple that is appropriate for your kiln and save.
  • For precaution, a small jumper must be moved on the circuit board when going from K to S. 
  • The Type S jumper is located at the top left of the board about 1/2" down from the board's top edge and about 1" in from the left side.
  • A customer asks if he can interlock his automatic kiln so that it will not fire unless his ventilation system is on. How do you accomplish this?

  • The basic concept is that you want to break the common wire that feeds the control and/or power relays of an L&L automatic kiln. (This gets more complicated with a manual kiln with a kiln sitter and this advice does not apply to manual kilns).
  • You will find the common wire for the relay coils coming from the "CT" terminal on the DynaTrol.
  • Just break that common wire with dry normally open contacts of a control relay. The amperage and voltage is very low (12 volts and a few amps at most).
  • Control the coil of your vent control relay with an output from your ventilation system.
  • That could be, for instance, a double-throw switch that operates a 120 volt coil or some other more sophisticated output from a sensor or perhaps an airflow switch that allows 120 volts or some other voltage to flow to your
  • Here are step by step instructions on how to create a custom program with ones own heating requirements with an added delay on the Genesis controller.
  • At the main "IDLE" screen, press the "LOAD" button.
  • On the right hand side of the "Load Program" menu there is a green scroll bar. Slide the scroll bar down until you see the 4th option which reads "4-Custom", then press this button.
  • Press any of the User slots to use for the specific program (The first three are blank and you can rename it later to describe the program for future use).
  • Once a user slot has been pressed, notification will appear stating that the program is loaded, press "OK".
  • You will then return to the main "IDLE" screen. Press the "EDIT" button to edit the currently loaded program.
  • At this point you will see the program title at the top of the screen along with data rows and columns for the segments.
  • Press the green section that display the
  • A customer asks:

    In the Dynatrol reference manual under SOAK it states “The control will soak at Final Set Point for up to 99 hours, 99 minutes and can be programmed to hold a temperature as long as 66 days before needing to be reset”. I cannot set this soak time greater 99 hours, 99 minutes. How can I set this for 30 days?

    Here is the math:
    Each segment in a vary-fire program can have a 99.99 hour hold.  8 segments x 99.99 hours is 799.92 hours.  Divide 799.92 by 24(hours) and you get 33.33 days. You can combine program 7 and 8 in one 16 segment program giving you a total of 66+ days.

    ADDITIONAL NOTE ABOUT THE 16-S COMMAND: If you want to run the two programs (USER 5 and USER 6) back to back and intend them to work as one 16 segment program, make sure that the temperature of the first segment in User 6 is higher than the temperature of the last segment in User 5. If you are trying to go from a higher final temperature of USER 5 to a lower

    There are some differences in the 600 series DynaTrol board and the 700 series DynaTrol board.

  • The two spades AC 1 and AC 2 are in different locations.  Question: Do we change the order of wires positions so the AC1 wire is to the relocated position? (Answer: Keep using the the same contacts and ignore their location)
  • There is a spade marked “Safety” on the new board. Do we ignore this point or do we need to do something different? (Answer: Ignore this contact)
  • Note the 700 series board has been used since January 2006. The 600 level board was used from April 2003 to December 2005. 

    For your first firing, just do the following: You are going to split the first firing into two days so that someone can always be around to check on it.

    On Day One
  • As early as you can, turn the kiln switch on, and wait to see IDLE.
  • Then press SLOW BISQUE/ ENTER/ 5/ ENTER/ 0/ ENTER/ PREHEAT/ 300/ ENTER/ START. It will start clicking off and on. This is normal. It is also normal to hear long periods of no clicking. The kiln will begin to climb slowly in temperature. At about 200 Deg F it will hold there for 3 hours. Then it will continue to climb.
  • When you are ready to head for home it may be up to 800 degrees more or less. Whatever the temperature is, just press STOP, then kiln switch off. Let it cool naturally.
  • On Day Two
  • As early as you can, turn the kiln switch on, wait to see IDLE. It does not matter if there is still heat in the kiln. Then press SLOW GLAZE/ ENTER/ 5/ ENTER/ 0/ ENTER/ START. It will be climbing quite a
  • Check your version on your control. See this video. The information on the version number is about 4 minutes into the video.
  • To find the latest version number of Genesis software that should be on your Genesis controller do the following: Check this link on the Bartlett website.
  • Click on the documentation tab and open the Revision Log.
  • The last number on the page is the latest version number.
  • Note: other documents are also available here.
  • See this video for how to update the software
  •  

  • Very Important! Be sure that the adjustments on the kiln-sitter have been properly set. See the kiln-sitter manual for details.
  • Load the kiln evenly and place a cone pack so it can be seen when looking through the center peephole. A cone pack is a series of three cones set in a line that you look at from the side; your target cone in the center, one cone cooler in front of it, and one cone hotter behind it.
  • Set the kiln-sitter timer to no more than a half hour longer than the kiln takes to fire. Or set it to maximum time if you are not sure how long it takes. Keep track of how long the firing takes so you can set the timer closer to the real firing time next time.
  • Set one cone higher than you fire to onto the kiln-sitter tube assembly inside the kiln while holding the kiln-sitter
  • CAUTION: USE THIS ONLY AS A STARTING POINT IN LEARNING THIS PROCESS

    IMPORTANT NOTE: There are many kinds of loads fired in kilns with infinite variations. There is bisque firing, glaze firing, variations in clay bodies, variations in the wetness of the clay and, of course, many other kinds of firing like glass, crystalline glazes, various industrial processes, etc. This guide is meant ONLY as a starting point. Rely on your own experience and that of other people who know to compliment and expand on this starting point. Unfortunately we can not be your ultimate resource for firing information. If you have further questions please contact your local distributor, Orton Firing Institute or local pottery guilds or organizations.

    Zone Switches on L&L kilns come in two varieties; 4 position switches which have settings for Low, Med, High, and Off, but nothing in between, and Infinite Switches which have Off, then 1, 2, 3 through 11 ending at High - basically an

    Automatic kilns and even manual kilns shut off by the use of cones are never as accurate as the human eye. 99.999% of time this is fine. However, for the rare artist who needs the utmost in precision, here is another method.

  • Set your kiln control to fire about 25 to 50 degrees higher than you need to to achieve proper maturation of your witness cones.
  • Know when your kiln will reach the approximate temperature that you want to achieve. Set the Alarm to start buzzing at a lower temperature (like 50 to 100 degrees below where the cones will mature. The Alarm is not very loud so be aware of that.
  • Watch the witness cone through the peephole (or better yet several witness cones through several peepholes).
  • Shut off the kiln power with the toggle switch as soon as the witness cone bends to the proper degree.
  • Note: This is essentially what potters did before they had automatic controls.

  • Very Important! Be sure that the adjustments on the kiln-sitter have been properly set. See the kiln-sitter manual for details.
  • Load the kiln evenly and place a cone pack so it can be seen when looking through each peephole. A cone pack is a series of three cones set in a line that you look at from the side; your target cone in the center, one cone cooler in front of it, and one cone hotter behind it.
  • Set the kiln-sitter timer to no more than a half hour longer than the kiln takes to fire. Or set it to maximum time if you are not sure how long it takes. Keep track of how long the firing takes so you can set the timer closer to the real firing time next time.
  • Set one cone higher than you fire to onto the kiln-sitter tube assembly inside the kiln while holding the kiln-sitter
  • Err2 can only happen in a hold segment.
  • One of the 3 temps has to be 50°F higher than the hold temp for this error to happen.
  • First, check the tightness of all 4 screws on each TC- be sure they are not so tight that they have partially cut through the wires. Look for any signs of overheated TC wires- if found, replace them immediately.
  • While the kiln is cold, plug it in but leave the toggle switch off. Does one ring of elements get hot anyway? If so, that is a stuck relay which must be replaced.
  • Otherwise, it is either a programming or loading error or possibly a bad DynaTrol. Loading errors might occur if everything is in the bottom of the kiln, something is too close to a TC, or there are too many short shelves in the bottom or somewhere in the kiln.
  • Err2 usually happens on a down-ramp, often because of how the kiln cools naturally with the load placed as it is in the kiln- one of the TC readings is not
  • Possible Reasons for E-1 (or Err1)

    NOTE: E- 1 errors read as "Err1" on controls manufactured before 2006

    Elements
    • If you see an E-1 or Err1, then for some reason the kiln could not generate enough heat to counter the heat loss. If one of the elements or one of the circuits in the control fails while the kiln is at a high enough temperature, then it will probably display an Err8 code (which means temperature is falling when it should be rising)
    • Err1 or Err8 can mean either you need new elements or a new component in one of the circuits. A Paper Test, an Ohms Test and a Voltage test can tell you which it is. 
    • Non-standard elements from an unauthorized supplier have too much resistance, or you did not hook them up properly (leaving the jumper wire out of a J230 section will double the resistance in that circuit and only one of the two elements will be used. Always use a ohms meter to check the element and circuit ohms.)

    E-22 is the same as E-6. It means one of the thermocouple wires is connected backwards.

    Here is how to fix it:

  • When the kiln is cold, start a fast glaze program to any cone number.
  • Once it starts firing press 1,2,3 and write down each different temperature.
  • 5 minutes later press 1,2,3 and write down each different temperature again. One of the thermocouple readings will now be lower, not higher than before. That is the thermocouple circuit with the problem. TC 1 is the top thermocouple, TC 2 the middle, and TC 3 is the bottom thermocouple.  Identify which thermocouple is reducing it's temperature as the kiln heats.
  • Press STOP and UNPLUG the kiln now.
  • Open the outer control box (top two screws on an Easy-Fire kiln) and look at the red and yellow wires at the connection strip on the back wall. It should be red to red and yellow to yellow AND start with yellow on the top and go yellow-red-yellow
  • Possible Reasons for E-5

    E- 5 errors read as "Err5" on controls manufactured before 2006

  • Loading may be uneven- try putting two elements between the bottom two shelves and add more mass to the upper areas in the kiln
  • Loading may be too close to the thermocouples.
  • Element(s) out- broken inside the kiln, look for damage or perform a paper test .
  • Element(s) out- a wire bringing power is burned off.
  • Element(s) out- the center relay is out. The kiln section's temp may noticeably lag behind at med/ high temperatures. Top or bottom relay failure usually gives an E- d
  • Thermocouples reading unevenly (from age or loading unevenly or too close to thermocouple).
  • Different style thermocouples used in same kiln.
  • Possibly there is an issue with thermocouple readings- like a thermocouple may be about to fail or have a poor connection somewhere
  • Note: E- d errors read as "Errd" on controls manufactured before 2006

    Basic Problem
  • In general E- d or Errd means that one of the thermocouples' temperatures is 50°F above traveling set point.
  • The basic cause of this is some condition that is causing the heat of the elements from not getting to the thermocouple tip or some sort of erroneous thermocouple reading.
  • This often happens during a first firing in an unloaded kiln. The first thing to do is to fire the kiln with shelves evenly loaded in the kiln (avoid putting the shelves directly in front of an element or allowing a shelf to touch a thermocouple.
  • If all else fails just turn off the Error Codes.
  • Potential Causes and SolutionsLoading and firing Issues
  • Loading may be uneven: Try making sure two elements are exposed between the bottom two shelves so that more heat is put in the bottom.
  • Load may be too close to or is
  • The ErrP (PF, E- P, E-P in some older models) comes from a reset of the processor during a firing. Things that can cause a reset are power loss, shorted relay coil, or electrical noise on the microprocessor circuit.
  • The shorted relay coil is easy. Every time the controller tries to turn on the relay the display will go blank.
  • A pilot relay set up (like in a DaVinci or Easy-Load panel) is usually the only time we have a noise issue. The cure includes a MOV across the contacts of the pilot relay (we do as standard). Moving wires away from the back of the controller and making sure the low Voltage wires and TC wires are not woven with the power wires is also important. See this link for more information on electrical noise.
  • The power loss is a little trickier since it is usually intermittent. It could be a bad connection, a bad fuse holder or
  • In some places the electrical power is very inconsistent with power outages, interruptions, blackouts, voltage spikes, voltage drops, or excessive environmental line noise (such as is caused by large 3-phase motors or phase angle fired SCRs) and other inconsistent noisy electricity. These are conditions found on overburdened power grids, in some factories, and sometimes in rural areas and in many countries. This can make the computer circuits in an automatic control produce errors that could affect your firing. 

    If this is something you are experiencing or expect to regularly experience there is an easy solution. You can do this yourself on an existing kiln or have it done by the factory. Basically all you need to do is to install a household type plug (the type of plug varies with country) to the control circuit and plug that into an Uninterruptible Power Supply with a battery back up.

    The normal way of wiring is have the power voltage for the kiln feed a

    It is possible random segments could be lit on the screen but if that happens (and it is very very rare) it will usually just read gibberish. There is no error code that is SRPF. It might be best to have them take a picture of the displayed message... but it could be an "ERTF" code. ERTF is a feature that stores information about how the kiln was behaving when it gets an error code. It stores the temperature, the number of hours the kiln fired for, and the rate of climb. "ERTF" appears for a second along with all this other information immediately after you clear an error code that showed up during a firing. The only time the display will read only ERTF and nothing else is when you enter into the "Hidden Other Menu" and press OTHER a number of times. One of the choices in this menu is ERTF. You would then press ENTER to see what was stored there about the last firing. You might ask them to keep track of any error codes or questionable displays that

    The ultimate in precision firing is achieved by using the DynaTrol to control the ramping of the kiln (both up and down) but using a witness cone and your eye to control when the firing stops.

    Kiln controls are limited in their intelligence. They rely on thermocouples (which drift in accuracy over time), ambient temperature compensation in the control, and the accuracy of the electronics themselves - to say nothing of the placement of work in relation to the thermocouples, weight of work, etc. Nothing will be better than using a large self-supporting witness cone and your eye looking through the peepholes to determine the best time to stop the firing.

    If you are firing an Easy-Fire program you can do this by just turning off the kiln when the proper degree on the cone is reached. You may need to set the program to fire to a higher cone or tweek the ocne offset or thermocouple offset to slightly overfire.

    What do you do if you want to manually control the end of

  • Remove the stand and the bottom.
  • Put the kiln on a firm surface like a skid with a piece of plywood on it and put a 1" piece of styrofoam on the wood.
  • Then put the kiln with the bottom section first.
  • Then put some thin strips of foam between the edge of the top section and the top of the kiln (you may have to remove it from the hinge). On kilns with the spring hinge you can cut pieces of styrofoam to fit to the sides of the metal hinge that sits on top.
  • Then put a piece of 1" styrofoam on top of the top, then the kiln bottom and then the stand.
  • Wrap everything tight with stretch wrap.
  • Protect the outside with cardboard or framing of some kind.
  • Turn on kiln switch.
  • Wait to see IDLE, or press ENTER.
  • Choose a firing program by pressing one of the EASY-FIRE program buttons. Press ENTER.
  • The display will say CONE. Enter the cone number that you want to fire to and then press ENTER. Be careful to enter the 0 as part of the cone number unless you are doing high-fire (Cone 06 vs 6).
  • The display will say HOLd. Leave it at 0.00 and press ENTER unless you have read the instructions about how holding affects firing. The display will now say IDLE (Complete).
  • Easy Option: Enter a Delay time. Program will start firing when timer finishes countdown.
  • EXAMPLE OF AN EASY-FIRE PROGRAM

    Slow Bisque Firing Profile to Cone 04, Pre-heat of 1 hour, 2 minute Hold - Use the following steps for a bisque firing to cone 04, a 2 minute temperature hold at the peak temperature, and a preheat stage with 1 hour hold time. THIS IS JUST AN EXAMPLE…You can change the firing profile, cone number, hold

    This consists of the main power cord, receptacle, powerblock, wire, and breakers. 

    Safety Warnings

    NOTE: If you are not sure about some part or procedure in creating or testing a power supply line for a kiln, DO NOT GUESS! If you wire something improperly, you might just blow the circuit breaker, or burn the place down. Get an electrician or someone who knows.
    NOTE: There are many different ratings on the wire and components that make up the supply line that need to be considered (along with proper and safe installation) when creating or testing a kiln power supply. It is beyond the scope of this manual to properly educate someone to fully understand the potential variations and variables involved in this. Often a building like a school or a recreation facility (or even a home) will be inspected for electrical code and fire code enforcement. If you do not own the building, or if the kiln is in anything other than a free standing private workshop for yourself

    Preheat Button
  • The Preheat feature can be used with the EASY-FIRE mode only.
  • When Preheat is in use, the temperature ramps up at 60°F/hour to 200°F and then holds at 200°F for the amount of time programmed.
  • If you start at a room temperature of 70°F, then it will take about 1-1/2 hours to reach 200°F at which time the hold segment in the Preheat will start.
  • Preheat is automatically set to zero during EASY-FIRE programming and at the end of each firing, so if a preheat stage is wanted, it must be reprogrammed for each cone firing.
  • Preheat Example: Set a preheat time of 3 hours.
  • Remember: You must choose and program an EASY-FIRE profile first, before you set the preheat time.
  • IdLE, TC2 and a temperature must be flashing to start the programming the PreHeat.
  • Press the PreHeat Button.
  • See Alternately flashing 0.00 and HLd.
  • Enter the time in hours and minutes. For 3 hours it will be 03.00. Press 3, then 0 and 0 again
  • Although we strongly recomment using the Vent-Sure downdraft vent there are some kilns that do not have them. Here are some recommendations for how to vent a kiln manually.

  • Prop lid 1" to 600F, then close lid. (Caution: if you forget the close the lid you could start a fire. You might set the Alarm to go off at that temperature)
  • Take all peephole plugs out to 1000F, then put back the bottom 2 peephole plugs in a 3 section kiln or just the bottom peephole plug in a two section kiln.
  • Keep the top peephole plug out until top temperature is reached, then put in all peephole plugs during cooldown.
  • Take all peeps out at 1000F for faster cooling.
  • Kiln Sitters in general
  • First, download the appropriate kiln-sitter manual from L&L’s website- (PDF Library/ Controls and Thermocouples section.)
  • Never let the kiln-sitter shut off the kiln unattended- always come back to check on it.
  • The kiln-sitter tube assembly needs to be routinely replaced depending on usage- especially if the sensing rod (the rod that sits on top of the cone) is getting thin or bent, or if the cone is looking puffy once the kiln cools down.  If not replaced and left unattended the kiln could dramatically overfire.
  • On unvented kilns, the kiln-sitter tube assembly must be replaced much more frequently.
  • Calibration

    If the kiln-sitter does not bend the cone enough or does not shut off soon enough:

  • VERY IMPORTANT- see the first couple pages in the kiln-sitter manual for step-by step adjustments. 
  • Or see the article here about how to adjust.
  • White Button does not stay in
  • Be sure the
  • All the elements will need to be replaced.  Why?  For example, the ohms on the JD2927 208 volt element circuits should be around 10.4. If you put 240 volts to each circuit it will pull around 23 amps per circuit- which is too much. There should not be more than 20 amps per circuit for the JD2927 208v kiln.
  • Computerized controls will run fine on 208 or 240 volts.
  • Changing voltage sometimes means pulling more amperage. Be sure to check the electrical specs for your kiln as it will be after the change.  For example, if you are changing to 240 volts look for the electrical specs your kiln as a 240 volt kiln. Be sure your breaker and wire size are large enough. Breaker size is determined by the new amp rating of the kiln, multiplied by 1.25 (125%) and then rounded up to the nearest breaker size. Wire size is tied to the breaker size:
  • 20 amps
    12 gauge copper30 amps10 gauge copper40 amps8 gauge copper50 amps6 gauge copper60 amps6 gauge
    Change Elements
  • All the elements will need to be replaced.
  • For example the ohms on the J2927 208 volt element circuits should be around 10.4. If you put 240 volts to each circuit it will pull around 23 amps per circuit- which is too much.
  • Should not be more than 20 amps per circuit for the J2927 208v kiln.
  • You May Need To Change Relays
  • Greater than 50 amp manual kilns were made with voltage specific relays and switches too. It is hard to say what will ultimately happen if you put 240 volts to a 208 volt switch or relay.  The switch might cycle on and off faster and probably burn out more quickly, and the magnetic field created by the relay coil would be stronger than it needed to be and probably burn out the relay sooner. The best thing is to swap these out for the right voltage if the relay coils are not multi-voltage.
  • If you are switching from 240 volts to 208 volts you will not get to temp if you are trying to get to cone 5.
  • All the elements will need to be replaced. For example, the ohms on the J230 208 volt element circuits should be around 14.2. If you put 240 volts to each circuit it will pull around 17 amps per circuit- which is too much. The infinite switch used in manual L&L kilns can only handle 15 amps. Some older J models, DaVincis, Ovals, B, SQ, G models were made with 208 volt infinite switches. It has been proven that 240 volt infinite switches work fine at 208 volts, but it has never been determined if 208 volt switches work fine at 240 volts. L&L's official recommendation is to replace 208 volt infinite switches with 240 volt switches when switching to 240 volts. When switching to 208 volts from 240 volts a switch change is not necessary. Changing voltage sometimes means pulling more amperage. Be sure to check the electrical specs for your kiln as it will be after the change- i.e. if you are changing to 240 volts look for the electrical specs your kiln as a

  • Dig it out of the wall carefully.
  • Use safety glasses and a dremel to carefully grind the glaze off the element.
  • Vacuum the kiln very well afterwards. 
  • It may break the element or not get all the glaze so probably count on replacing the element before too long.
  • We don't offer any coatings for elements. There is an ITC coating that some people claim to use with success. However, L&L does not recommend it because it reduces the distance between the coils which then overheats the coils and defeats any benefit you may have gained.

    The best thing to do is to completely oxidize the elements in between any reduction firing you do. Fire the kiln to cone 5 or so in a good oxidizing atmosphere. That will do the most to protect the surface the elements. Also see this link: http://www.claytimes.com/articles/improvingkiln.html

    Also - be careful of alcohol drip and any other means of producing a reduction firing in an electric kiln because of its flammability and carbon monoxide which could be generated.

    • This is fine to do if you are careful.
    • The only concern would be if you put the wrong elements in the kiln, or connected them to power incorrectly when you replace them.
    • If this happened, you would most likely ruin the inside of the kiln and possibly start a fire in the kiln's control box. This is because your circuit breaker and the copper wires to the outlet can accommodate a lot more power than the kiln wiring and components are designed to handle.

    Yes - there is an installation checklist.

    See this page.

    The kiln will automatically shut off the program after the firing. If you do turn off the kiln with the on/off switch you can force it to shut down but you don't have to. You can turn it back on anytime to see the temperature. If it is in the middle of a firing when you shut it off, and you don't shut it off for more than 30 minutes, it will resume its program.

    Home> Knowledgebase> Error Codes

     

    This is a list of all Error codes for the DynaTrol.

    Note: Many of these error codes have an ‘Err’ prefix rather than an ‘E-‘ prefix on kilns made before Jan 2006.

    Errors only detected when error codes setting is turned ON:
  • E- A (E-A, EA, ErA, Er A, or Error A) - is the result of having too high a number programmed into one or more of the segments of the Vary-Fire program you are trying to fire.
  • E- d (E-d, ErrD, ED, ErD) – One of the thermocouples' temperatures is 50°F above traveling set point.  (Also see what it says under E- 9 below
  • Question: On the thermocouple terminal block of our Type S thermocouple, one screw is clearly labeled with a bright red ‘+’ and the other has a dark black ‘-‘. However, in thermocouple wire, the negative leg is always red (at least in the US). Could you please let me know if in the factory you connect the red to negative/black to positive controller input terminals, or if you correct for the labeling of the thermocouples, and have red to positive?

    Answer: On our type S thermocouples (which we get from Europe) the "+" is marked with red and the "-" is marked with black. The lead wire we use (from the USA) is red for negative and black for positive. (this answer is true for non-European kilns). The worst that can happen if the thermocopule wires get reversed is that the control will read negative which will create a quick alarm condition.