How can my kiln section stay on all the time on my manual kiln even when the kiln-sitter is off?

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How can my kiln section stay on all the time on my manual kiln even when the kiln-sitter is off?

Usually this means a relay is stuck on and needs to be replaced.

  1. On 3-phase kilns, and on any kilns that pull more than 48 amps, only the power needed to turn on the relays passes through the kiln-sitter. The power to turn the elements on passes through the relays, but not through the kiln-sitter in these kilns.  This is why the kiln-sitter can be tripped off and you can still have one kiln section staying on.
  2. If a relay is on when there is power coming to the kiln, even when that kiln section's switch or the kiln sitter is off, usually it means that the contacts have welded themselves shut and even when everything else (except the breaker) is off, the relay will not turn it off.
  3. Contacts weld themselves shut for a number of reasons like misalignment, age, corrosion, cycling too fast etc. Really though, it is because they get too hot.
  4. Whenever any contacts open and shut, there is a little spark of electricity right before/ after they shut/ open.  This arc is very, very hot.
  5. If there is a lot of arcing, like in a chattering relay, you can melt the contacts together pretty quickly.

Additional Actions to Take

  • Power relays are one of the most important components in your kiln. They execute the will of the computer controller, giving power to the elements only when requested. These power relays are also mechanical switches which will wear out over time. Worn out relays can be the cause of slow or incomplete firings, error codes (E-1, E-d), etc. Other more obvious signs of relay failure are if a zone is lagging behind in temperature considerably or if you notice an entire ring of elements not heating/glowing. 
  • The surest way to test your relays is by using a multimeter to check input, output, and signal voltage. If you do not have access to a multimeter you can run a paper test, which will give you some indication of whether or not you have a relay out.

Process

  1. One way to check the relays (or bad elements) is to check the temperatures of each zone by pressing "1", "2" and "3" in sequence and recording the temperatures of each thermocouple at intervals over the length of the firing. If one zone is consistently firing at a lower temperature then you probably have either burned out elements or a bad relay.
  2. If the relay does not make a soft clicking noise when the kiln is turned on try turning the kiln off and on and then restarting the program.
  3. Remove panel.
  4. Set your multi-meter the approximately 24 volts AC. Check the voltage coming into the coil of the Power Relay. You can tell which wires these are because they will be the small wires coming from the control. This test will tell you if you are getting power to the relay coil which actuates the relay. Unless the relay is actuated by the control you will get no output from the power side of the relay.
  5. With panel plugged in and firing check output from Power Relay with your digital multi-meter. The meter should be set to the next highest voltage above 240 volts AC. Output should be approximately the rated voltage of the kiln when it is supposed to be calling for power to the elements.

CAUTION: LIVE ELECTRICITY IS INVOLVED WITH SOME OF THESE TESTS. This test should only be done by an experienced person familiar with electricity.

  1. Unplug kiln.
  2. Remove the control box and the insulation panel.
  3. Remove the wires to the relay.
  4. Remove the nuts from the studs that hold the relay in place. Remove old relay and replace with new one.
  5. Visually inspect the wire connectors. Do they look corroded or "cooked"? Are the wires frayed? Any corrosion on the wire itself? If any of this is questionable you should replace the appropriate wires.
  6. Reconnect all wires. Visually inspect to make sure the spade connectors are down as far as they can go and feel to see that they are tight (a gentle tug should not remove one). If they are loose for some reason remove the wire and slightly squeeze the spade connector with pliers to tighten it.

IMPORTANT: The slip on wire connectors cannot be loose or corroded. If there is a bad connection then heat will be generated and the component that they slip onto (relay, terminal strip, etc) may overheat and fail. If you squeeze the slip on terminal to make it tighter–be sure to squeeze it evenly so that one side is not tight and the other loose. If there are any doubts about the integrity of the wire or the connector replace the whole wire or harness.

 

How to check a relay in an Easy-Fire Kilns

  1. Similar in any L&L automatic kiln.
  2. Follow proper electrical safety practices.

Parts

  1. See this page for the 12 Volt 30 Amp relay we use for most kilns.
  2. See this page for the 240 Volt 30 Amp relay we use as a control relay for 480 volt kilns.
  3. See this page for all contactors and relays.

 

How to change a relay in an Easy-Fire Kilns

  1. Be sure to keep the wires on in the right sequence when changing a power or control relay in an Easy-Fire, Easy-Fire XT, School-Master or eQuad-Pro Kiln.
  2. The configuration is similar in a Jupiter panel or as control relay in a DaVinci, Hercules, or Easy-Load panel.
  3. Make sure kiln is unplugged or locked out and tagged out at the circuit breaker or fused disconnect switch when doing this maintenance.

Parts

  1. See this page for the 12 Volt 30 Amp relay we use for most kilns.
  2. See this page for the 240 Volt 30 Amp relay we use as a control relay for 480 volt kilns.
  3. See this page for all contactors and relays.