Customer Repairs Old Duncan Lid with our Phosphate Cement and Video Help

I just watched (for the second time!) your excellent video regarding the repair of a kiln lid.  Thank you so much for that; it is extremely helpful!  Now I just have to find a source for Greenset 94P.  Do you sell it?  Or can you recommend a supplier?  Thanks for your help!

Virginia, Artist.
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The Service Team, L&L Kiln Mfg., Inc.
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Can I ask what you recommend for what quantity I might need for a badly cracked 28″ lid?  (Picture attached)

Virginia, Artist.
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I would get a quart. Looks like a Skutt lid?
The Service Team, L&L Kiln Mfg., Inc.
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An old Duncan DK 1029-2, that I retrieved from a neighbor’s trash 25+ years ago, haha!
Virginia, Artist.
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Sorry to bother you AGAIN, but I am curious about the ingredients in the phosphate kiln cement.  Is it possible to get a MSDS as a pdf on it before ordering?
Virginia, Artist.
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The Service Team, L&L Kiln Mfg., Inc.
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Hello again,
Attached is a photo of my kiln lid, after I went through the process outlined in that great video.  It is still drying, and I still need to re-attach the hinge and fire it, but it seems really rigid and strong, and I’m thrilled so far!  I do have a question.  The video recommends firing to cone 5.  I never fire to cone 5.  The highest I go is 04.  Is cone 5 absolutely necessary?  I don’t like the idea of firing an empty kiln to cone 5….seems like such a waste.  Any thoughts from you or your technicians there?
Thanks so much for your help.
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Virginia, Artist.
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Virginia – it is not necessary to go to cone 5 – just fire to whatever temperature you do normally. Let me know how it holds up – I really want to know if this works well for an old lid like that. Was it easy for you to do?
The Service Team, L&L Kiln Mfg., Inc.
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L&L,
Thanks for your quick response.  That’s a big help, not having to fire all the way to cone 5.
As to the ease of execution, I would say that It wasn’t bad! I watched the video three times before doing the work, and took notes the last time.  I kept my notes close by while I was working. Before I started, I made sure the space on which I set the lid (my studio floor) was perfectly flat and covered it with plastic, which I made clean-up easy. The lid is now sitting in the same spot on a piece of cardboard; I plan to fire it tomorrow.
It is important to note that of course, the cement adds a little bit to the dimension of the lid — and with so many cracks in mine, the addition was significant (about 1/2″ to 3/4″ maybe).  I used almost the entire quart of cement!  There’s about 1/2″ left in the bottom of the jar, so your recommendation of a quart was spot-on.
I will check in after several firings to report how it works.
Thanks!
Virginia, Artist.
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Hello L&L,
Please accept my apologies for not getting back to you sooner about the performance of my repaired kiln lid.  Since April 27, I have fired the kiln at least twelve times.  The lid is perfect!  It is REALLY strong.  The only difference is that the repair has resulted in the lid being heavier than it was originally.  This has not affected its performance at all, except that now, with no cracks, it holds the heat in better!  I am ecstatic with this repair!  Thanks again for all your help.  The instructional video was extremely helpful as well.
I’m hoping to get another 20 years out of this thing.
Best,
Virginia